God Loves Lawyers (Part 1): The Myth of the Less Godly Profession

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During Spring Break I visited the law school I will be attending this Fall. 

I’ve come to dread Christians asking me what I’m going to do now that I’ve graduated college. When I give my simple five word reply, “I’m going to law school,” I immediately feel my smile turn to a grimace as I read their face and anticipate their response. The responses are usually similar: a fake plastered smile and a slow nod preceded by a lawyer joke or being told, “Good, we need more lawyers to defend Christians.” I’ve received this response enough that I now simply return the nod and smile. I’ve previously made the mistake of trying to defend my career choice; not only of being a lawyer, but expressing my lack of desire in being a lawyer that seeks to only defend Christians. I had thought this was an experience unique to me and lawyers, however, I spoke with friends recently–a graphic designer, an engineer, and an accountant–only to learn that they have had similar experiences. It’s as if our professions aren’t good enough, aren’t Christian enough. We’ve even been accused of being “worldly,” simply because we are not pursuing the seemingly “more Christian” professions of missionaries, Sunday School teachers and full-time missionaries….although I would argue becoming a teacher at a Christian school or a nurse would also be an “acceptable Christian profession” by many.

These conversations are too similar. For too long American Christians have wrongly believed that certain professions are “more Christian” or “More Godly” than others. Are we not all called to different mission fields? Have we not all been given different gifts and talents and personalities? If we were all to be “only” mothers, nursers, and foreign missionaries how many tens of thousands of peoples would actually MISS an opportunity to hear the gospel?

God Called A Tax Collector First

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St. Matthew is often depicted with a pen. 

One of my favorite accounts in the Bible is that of Matthew, the tax collector:

As Jesus was walking along, He saw a man named Matthew sitting at his tax collector’s booth. “Follow me and be my disciple,” Jesus said to him. So Matthew got up and followed him. Later, Matthew invited Jesus and his disciples to his home as dinner guests, along with many tax collectors and other disreputable sinners. But when the Pharisees saw this, they asked his disciples, “Why does your teacher eat with such scum?” When Jesus heard this, He said, “Healthy people don’t need a doctor–sick people do.” Then He added, “Now go and learn the meaning of this Scripture: “I want you to show mercy, not offer sacrifices. For I have come to call not those who think they are righteous, but those who know they are sinners.”~Matthew 9:9-13

For the first part of this blog post serious, I want to focus on part of the obvious that I feel gets overlooked: Jesus called a tax collector to be His first disciple. One thing has not changed in the past two thousand years: no one enjoys paying their taxes. Even though we may be able to reason through the benefits of paying taxes, like “free” public school education, roads, and national defense, I have yet to many an individual that gets excited to see how much money has been taken out of their pay stub for taxes. I certainly don’t!

I have a deep pity for those who work for the IRS, because I can only imagine the slew of remarks they get when others learn of their job. However, few people would argue that what these people do is actually immoral. Sure, there are those who refuse to pay taxes each year because they believe their dollars are going towards funding abortion or wars they don’t agree with, but few feel their tax dollars are being used to persecute them and their own people. We are paying our government, after all, not a foreign invader. However, the Jews were being forced to pay taxes to the Roman Empire: an invader whom committed atrocities against them and their people. Obviously, Matthew would have been disposed.

Yet, Jesus called him, and called him first. At first glance this post my seem contradictory to my previous statements; after all, the Biblical account states that Matthew got up and followed him. Matthew left his job to be a discipline of Christ Jesus. When he left his tax collection booth that day he was guaranteed to lose his profession. That takes faith! I can’t help but think how many people would be willing to do what God asked if it meant seemingly complete and total financial insecurity…not many. Although Matthew indeed got up and left his sinful profession–and we should all leave our profession if it is sinful–he took his gifts, talents, interests and skills with him, and blessed the world through these.

Gifts, Talents, and Interests

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No gray area. 

I’ve been told that I think in the black and white a lot. For some of my friends, this can be annoying. To be, something is either right OR wrong. There is no gray area. Never.

Likewise, I absolutely love to plan! I planned out my entire college schedule while in high school after I accidentally gained access to my future university’s student website that listed class meeting times; and for fun I have attempted to plan my future law school schedule. I love lists and color coding. In fact, I will be put in a very deep rut for several days if something schedule did not happen, or the schedule was not followed.

I’m also a gifted speaker, outgoing, charismatic, and empathetic.

These are just some of the ways I’m wired. These above characteristics are part of who I am, and just happen to be gifts/skills that align well with a legal profession.

God does not ask us to give up our gifts and skills, in fact, He does the opposite. He asks us to use those gifts for Him. Matthew, as a tax collected, was accustomed to taking detailed notes and accounts. He obviously liked precision, and was gifted in retaining and sorting information. Although He had previously used these skills in his job as a tax collector, He then used his skills to record the first Gospel of the New Testament. Billions of people for thousands of years have read his detailed accounts, and individuals right now are trying to translate his accounts of his time with Jesus into every single language spoken on the planet and even those not spoken! Talk about a huge task! God was thus able to use his talents and interests to serve Him.

Just as our bodies have many parts and each part has a special function, so it is with Christ’s body. We are many parts of one body, and we each belong to each other. ~Romans 12:5

There are many specific spiritual gifts named throughout the Bible: teaching, prophesy, empathy, encouragement, ect. And these spiritual gifts are used to nourish, encourage and grow what we call the “Body of Christ”, that is, Christians. However, God has also designed each person with unique talents: being outgoing, creative, more reserved, or having an exceptional athletic/musical/other talent. As I will talk more about in my next post, these talents, our interests, and professions allow us to reach individuals with the gospel that those serving in traditional missionary fields (pastors, full-time missionaries, ect.) cannot reach. Instead of being ashamed of our talents, or think we need to give up these talents, we need to think: how can I use these talents and see my gifts as my mission field? 

Bloom Where You Are Planted

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During college I pursued four majors and several minors, simply because I enjoy learning. At my college’s awards ceremony these achievements were recognized. 

Growing up I was “shushed” a lot. I always had something to say. I read non-fiction historical books and watched documentaries from a young age. Although I’ve had to learn that there are appropriate times to share information, and am thankful for a recent ADD diagnosed and medications that have helped calmed the constant tornado in my brain, I have grown up thinking that being smart is not cool. My family talks a lot about how they wished I had more “common sense.” Many of my family members are gifted carpenters, plumbers, and overall handymen and women, they can fix just about anything and their mind works this way. I can only imagine how strange it must have been for them to have a child that wanted to read thick biographies about presidents instead of learn to fix things around the house. I was labeled as lazy, book-smart, and different. Although I’m 22, being categorized as these things, and not having my intellect and desire to learn nurtured and appreciated, still hurt.

I wanted to share these parts of my story, to conclude by saying: the gifts God has given you and the way He has made you matters. It should be celebrated. My outgoing personality, love for facts, and desire for truth will serve me well as an attorney. I can use the talents God has given me to work with integrity, and bring glory to Him by using the talents and interests God has given me, and using them well to the best of my ability, And, more importantly,  I can use my profession as an attorney to share my faith with individuals who would otherwise never set foot in a church or a mission outreach.

Never be ashamed of the talents and interests God has given you. Use these to do good, and to pursue things you enjoy that glorify God. We’re not all called to speak from the pulpit every Sunday, nor are we all called to sell our belongings and move to an unreached people group. Some of us were designed to stay where we were born, and do jobs that are wrongly labeled as “less Christian.” We must bloom where we are planted. God needs people of all skills and talents, including tax collectors like Matthew and future lawyers like me.

xoxo
Krista

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Women Rule the World, And Destroy Each Other While Doing It

I was notified that today is my “Blog-Aversary.” Therefore, I thought it was fitting to post about something that I’ve been thinking about for several months: girl wars. Prior to doing my senior research project on perceptions of working mothers, I had thought only “mommy wars” existed. However, it is not only moms that fight with each other about what moms should and should not do, it’s all women.

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Presenting My Senior Presentation

Mommy Wars

I grew up in a conservative faith background, in arguably the most progressive state (Vermont), in a family where the women “wore the pants.” I had my fair experience witnessing women, in person and on Facebook, tear each other apart for working or staying home. Stay-At-Home Moms (SAHM) argued that working mothers—regardless of if the woman was working by choice or because her family needed the extra income—were unloving and neglecting their children, while working mothers argued that SAHMs were ungrateful for all of the work women had done during the past century for gender equality. Both NOT true. The gloves really came off when a homeschooling SAHM went to bat against a working mother whose chose to send her children to public school.

My Experience

All of the women in my large extended family worked at a business or worked from home. My mom and grandma, and many of my extended family members, were at every single concert/meet/game I played within driving distance from PreK-12th grade. They asked me about my life, I was able to tell they deeply cared, and I was never able to empathize with the argument that because women in my family worked I was unloved or neglected.

However, as I became friends with more conservative families my sophomore year of high school, I heard the “other side.” Every Christian friend I had grew up with a SAHM. Even after they graduated, their mother chose to stay home. I made the BIG MISTAKE of asking one of their moms (we were close, so I didn’t think it would be terribly awkward), “What do you DO all day?” Only to receive the stink eye, a thorough lecture, and a large serving of humble pie. Do not ever ask a SAHM that. Ever. Nope. Never.

As I became close to these more traditional families, I realized I was “suppose” to be a SAHM. I listened to sermons at various places about how a woman was suppose to be a help-mate, how she was designed to care for her children, and how the majority of problems with our youth come from a MOTHER not being home. I came to understand that it was my duty as a woman designed by God, and (hopefully) a future wife and mother, to be a stay at home mother.

However, I’ve always enjoyed school. Always. I feel God has gifted me academically, and thoroughly enjoy reading research journals. During high school I completed the first two years of nursing school because I planned to enter an accelerated nursing program. I thought nursing could be my happy medium, as I could keep my license and maybe work part time when my future children were in school.

I didn’t begin to realize that maybe I wasn’t DESTINED to be a SAHM until my high school graduation. I received multiple academic awards, and was told about the bright future I had. And I hated it, because with each compliment  I thought, “It would be nice to continue school, too bad I’m going to be stuck home.”

DISCLAIMER: I don’t feel women who CHOSE to say home are uneducated (many SAHMs are super smart) or that they’re any less. But for ME I felt obligated and awful.

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Scholarship Announcement in the Newspaper

 

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My dad, me, my younger brother at Senior Awards Night

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I arrived at college, I had extra room in my schedule, and took classes that interested me. I realized I was gifted in, and really enjoyed, law and debating. After several tearful meetings with my academic advisor, I realized I should aim to go to law school. As I worked in sexual assault advocacy, and observed the work done by attorneys, for the first time in my life I really felt my calling, and God telling me, “This is what you’re suppose to do, Kris.”

To my disappointment, this “Divine Affirmation” if you will, provided little comfort. As I still felt like I was being a “bad” Christian. Yes, I was single and marriage and motherhood were no where close, but as a planner, it still stressed me out.

“How Can You Do That?”

When I began posting more about my law school application journey this past Spring, I was honestly quite shocked at the push back I received from many Christian women. “Why are you going to spend all that time and money when you’re just going to have kids?” Was a frequent question. Surprisingly, the only flack I received was from women. I think I’ve read more blogs about being a working mother than any single woman my age, because I wanted to have a good response to these questions.

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This is my letter of intent that I sent to say I would be attending Brooklyn Law School in New York City this fall. I received some pretty heated/unkind comments.

Woman Wars

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I took a Gender Studies class (yes, at a Christian University by an Obama-supporting liberal, chew on that) my junior year and I became more aware of the many struggles that face working mothers. I thought about this material quite often, and when it came time to chose a topic for my senior research project on perceptions of working mothers.

My Research

My project consisted of three scenarios: Karen, Jenny, and Mollie. These scenarios were split between nearly 200 participants. Karen was a mom who took maternity leave and then returned to work, Mollie became a stay at home mom, and Jenny chose to go back to work a few weeks after giving birth.

My original hypothesis was that a recipient would be less supportive of a woman working if a) They had a stay at home mom or b) Their mother did not possess a college degree or higher. This was not supportive, instead, I found that the ONLY CONSISTENT factors of approval/disapproval were religion and gender. Christians overwhelming did not support women working, and men were more in favor of women working. Not what I expected at all.

We Need to Stop the Fighting

Ladies, we must stop fighting. I firmly believe that SAHMs and working moms deeply love their children, and have made their career decisions with their family’s best interest at heart. So here are my questions:

  1. Why does it matter to YOU if another woman works or stays home?
  2. Why would her decision change how you treat her.

God has given everyone special gifts and talents. And I believe some of these talents (like law, for me) can really be best used outside of the home. Does this make me less Christian? Less loving? NO!

As Christians we need to support everyone woman’s right to pursue the talents God has given her, even if her decisions are different than the ones we would make for ourself.

Additionally, we must always be kind, encouraging and and respectful of one another. ALWAYS. As women, and Christians, we have enough against us. The last thing we need is internal division over how we pursue ministry callings.

Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you. Eph. 4:23

So encourage each other and build each other up, just as you are already doing.1 Thess. 5:11

Be kind, be smart, be fierce.

xoxo

Krista